Affirmation Center
One Main Street
Hartford, CT 06106

Phone: (860) 727-8703
Fax: (860) 548-2045

Cole Center
2550 Main Steet
Hartford, CT 06120

Phone: (860) 548-0101
Fax: (860) 524-7781

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Tobacco's Grip on U.S. Veterans

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jan 11th 2018

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 40 percent of U.S. military veterans smoke or use some form of tobacco.

Data from 2010-2015 revealed that 21.6 percent of veterans reported current use (within the past 30 days) of cigarettes, 6.2 percent used cigars, 5.2 percent used smokeless tobacco, 3 percent used roll-your-own tobacco, and 1.5 percent used pipes, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Tobacco use was higher among veterans than non-veterans for males and females across all age groups, except for males 50 and older.

Among veterans, current tobacco use was highest among those: with no health insurance (60 percent); living in poverty (54 percent); ages 18 to 25 (57 percent); with serious mental distress (48 percent); with a family income of less than $20,000 (44 percent); and with less than a high school diploma (38 percent).

Tobacco use among current and former military personnel was associated with high medical costs. In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration spent $2.7 billion on smoking-related ambulatory care, prescription drugs, hospitalization, and home health care, the report found.

The findings appear in the Jan. 12 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

"These findings highlight the importance of further protecting the health of our military veterans," said Corinne Graffunder, director of the CDC's Office on Smoking and Health.

"We must redouble our efforts to help veterans quit and reduce the preventable suffering and premature death caused by tobacco use," she said in an agency news release.

More than one-third of active duty U.S. military personnel who smoke took up the habit after enlisting, so it's important to provide effective tobacco prevention programs for both current and former military members, according to the CDC.

More information

The American Cancer Society offers a guide to quitting smoking.




To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH's Intake Department at 860-548-0101 x354.

 

Affirmation Center
One Main Street

Hartford, CT 06106
Phone: (860) 727-8703
Fax: (860) 548-2045
Mon & Tu: 8:30 - 7:00
Wed, Th, Fri, Sat: 8:30 - 4:30

Cole Center
2550 Main Street
Hartford, CT 06120
Phone: (860) 548-0101
Fax: (860) 524-7781
Mon, Tu, & Fri: 8:30 - 4:30
Wed & Thu: 8:30 - 7:00

Our offices are closed from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM for lunch.

 

CRISIS HOTLINE:

Children (under 18),
please call 211.

Adults, please call our mobile
crisis unit at 860-297-0999

For an immediate crisis call 911.


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