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Health Tip: Risk Factors For Insomnia


HealthDay News
Updated: Mar 13th 2018

(HealthDay News) -- Insomnia -- the inability to fall asleep or stay asleep -- affects more women than men, and older people more than younger ones.

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says people at increased risk for insomnia include those who:

  • Are stressed.
  • Are depressed or have emotional health issues, such as those going through divorce or the death of a spouse.
  • Have lower incomes.
  • Work at night or have frequent changes in work hours.
  • Travel across time zones.
  • Don't exercise regularly.




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