Pain Management
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Physical Therapy Can Help You Avoid Opioids When Joint Pain StrikesNagging Low Back Pain? Try MindfulnessOpioids Plus Other Drugs a Deadly Mix for Heavy UsersHealth Tip: Manage Pain With OpioidsDoctors More Cautious Now When Prescribing Opioids to KidsEven Wisdom Tooth Removal May Spur Opioid AddictionOnly a Quarter of Opioid Painkillers Taken After Most SurgeriesOpioid Use May Sometimes Trigger A-FibFDA Approves Powerful New Opioid Despite CriticismsNew Nerve Stimulation Technique Might Relieve Back PainDespite Opioid Crisis, Most Patients Want the Drugs for Post-Op PainFor Pain Relief, Why Not Try Drug-Free Alternatives?1 in 12 Americans Lives With Debilitating Chronic PainMindfulness May Be a Buffer Against PainCould a Placebo Pill Help Ease Your Back Pain?Chronic Pain May Drive Some to SuicideMonkey Trials Raise Hope for Non-Addictive Opioid AlternativeGovernment Rules Aimed at Curbing Opioid Prescriptions May Have BackfiredAs Opioid Epidemic Rages, Painkiller Prescriptions Don't DropMost Seniors Uninformed on Opioid UseSprained Ankle? Opioid Rx More Likely in Some States Than OthersOpioids Before Joint Replacement Tied to Worse RecoveryCould Botox Cousin Combat the Opioid Epidemic?Where Are Opioid Painkillers Prescribed the Most?Anti-seizure Meds Won't Ease Low Back PainMedical Marijuana a Hit With SeniorsRisky Prescribing Boosts Opioid Death RiskPatients on Opioids OK With Lower DosesPatterns of Potential Misuse Help Assess Risk of Opioid OverdoseHospitals Should, and Could, Avoid IV Opioids: StudyOpioid Makers' Perks to Docs Tied to More PrescriptionsPsychological Therapies May Help Older Adults With Chronic PainStudy Finds 31 Percent Use No Opioids After SurgeryAddictive Opioids Still Overprescribed After Surgery: StudyDoctors Curbing First-Time Prescriptions for OpioidsFDA Recalls Kratom Products Due to Salmonella ThreatMillions Get Wrong Treatment for Back Pain: StudyManaging Pain With Fewer Opioids After Joint ReplacementDoctors Present Recs For and Against Acupuncture for PainOpioids Don't Top Non-Opioids for Pain-Related FunctionOpioids Not Best Option for Back Pain, Arthritis, Study FindsGroup CBT, Pain Education Improve Pain, Physical FunctionChronic Opioid Users May Wish to Taper Opioid UseSome Pain Patients Can Cut Opioid Dose and Still Get ReliefAnother Downside to Opioid Use: Pneumonia?Long-Term Opioid Use Down Among U.S. Vets: StudyLosing Weight Eases Obesity-Related Pain. But How Much Is Enough?Do Over-the-Counter Painkillers Alter Emotions, Reasoning?Opioid Prescribing Trends in the VA Similar to Other SettingsHow to Avoid Opioid Addiction After Surgery
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Medications

1 in 12 Americans Lives With Debilitating Chronic Pain

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Sep 14th 2018

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Of the 50 million Americans living with chronic pain, the pain is so bad for 20 million that it keeps them from doing the daily activities of life, researchers say.

According to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain are more common among women, older adults, the poor, people previously employed, those with public health insurance or living in rural areas.

Not only is chronic pain widespread, it lies at the root of the opioid epidemic, said Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center in New Haven, Conn.

"Potentially overlooked is the crisis that precipitated the opioid crisis -- the high prevalence of chronic pain in need of relief," he said.

The CDC report is a reminder that an epidemic of chronic pain existed before it was compounded by an epidemic of opioid misuse, explained Katz, who was not involved with the new study.

Chronic pain must be prevented more often and treated with compassion, effectiveness and safety once it begins, he added. "Efforts to limit the harms of opioid analgesics cannot result in neglect of patients' pain," Katz said.

Coping with chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain are associated with restrictions in mobility and daily activities, opioid dependence, anxiety, depression and a poor quality of life, according to the study authors.

In addition to the suffering of millions of citizens, chronic pain costs an estimated $560 billion each year in medical expenses, lost productivity and disability programs, the researchers said.

In light of these problems, mainstream medicine must embrace valid approaches to pain management other than drugs, Katz suggested.

"This is already an established objective among those dedicated to state-of-the-art pain management, but it must become the routine standard of care," he said.

Care must be more holistic and patient-oriented, Katz stressed.

A prescription for an opioid is a quick, easy response from a busy doctor. "But the patient in pain might improve with better sleep, stress reduction and relief of loneliness," Katz said.

Dr. Mark Bicket, an assistant professor of anesthesiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, said that effective pain management needs to be a team effort. "Appropriate treatment for chronic pain involves more than just medicines," he explained.

Managing chronic pain effectively involves a group that includes doctors, physical therapists and others, and activities like yoga or meditation, Bicket said.

And non-narcotic painkillers -- such as Aleve or Tylenol -- may be just as effective in controlling chronic pain. Typically, a combination of a painkiller and exercise or physical therapy is the most effective way to manage chronic pain, he said.

"If you are living with chronic pain, you are not alone," Bicket said. "And you deserve to have a discussion about the different options to treat your pain."

The researchers, led by James Dahlhamer, of the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, published their findings Sept. 14 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More information

Visit the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for more on chronic pain.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net