Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Primary Care Doctors Help Boost Life Spans, But More Are NeededMore Car Crashes Tied to Drivers High on OpioidsPoor Whites Bear the Brunt of U.S. Opioid Crisis, Studies FindFDA to Tighten Oversight of SupplementsAs U.S. Measles Outbreaks Spread, Why Does 'Anti-Vax' Movement Persist?Even Brief EMS Delay Can Cost Lives After Car CrashHealth Tip: Know Your Family's Medical HistoryPatients With Primary Care Docs May Get Better Health CareIs Brexit a Health Hazard?Blood Donors Needed as Cold Weather Freezes U.S. SupplyMedical Scribes Could Help Improve ER CareAHA: Medical Experts 'Sound the Alarm' on Medical MisinformationWhite House Plan to Disclose Drug Prices May Not Drive Down Costs: StudyCan Artificial Intelligence Read X-Rays?Virtual Doctor Visits Get High Marks in New SurveyBig Pharma's Marketing to Docs Helped Trigger Opioid Crisis: StudyDisrupted Sleep Plagues Hospital Patients, But New Program Might HelpOpioid Prescriptions Almost Twice as Likely for Rural vs. Urban AmericansClimate Change Already Hurting Human Health, Review ShowsCalling All Blood Donors …Even Older Drugs Are Getting Steep Price Hikes, Study FindsAs Medical Marketing Soars, Is Regulation Needed?Radiation Doses From CT Scans Vary WidelyU.S. Leads Health Care Spending Among Richer Nations, But Gets LessIs Your State a Hotspot for Obesity-Linked Cancers?Health Tip: Choose the Right DoctorFDA Warns Companies on Dangerous, Unapproved Stem Cell TreatmentsMore U.S. Kids Dying From Guns, Car AccidentsRoad Rules on Smartphone Use Are Saving Bikers' Lives, TooAHA: Should Pacemakers, Defibrillators Be Recycled -- and Reused in Others?California Farm Tied to E. coli Outbreak Expands Recall Beyond Romaine LettuceHealth Tip: Use Medical Devices SafelyCalifornia Farm Implicated in Outbreak of E. coli Tied to Romaine LettuceFentanyl Now the No. 1 Opioid OD KillerHospitalizations Rising Among the HomelessElectronic Health Records Bogging Docs DownMore Are Seeking Mental Health Care, But Not Always Those Who Need It MostMillions of Americans Still Breathing Secondhand Smoke: ReportNew Approach to Opioid Crisis: Supervised Heroin Injection Programs?Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted, 'Personalized' Medicine: PollAs Gun Violence Grows, U.S. Life Expectancy DropsMost Americans Lie to Their DoctorsOpioid Crisis, Suicides Driving Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy: CDCWant to Learn CPR? Try an Automated KioskHealth Surrogates Often in Dark About Loved One's WishesRestaurant 'Health Grade' Posters Could Mean Safer DiningSmoking Bans Might Help Nonsmokers' Blood PressureWarmer Winters, More Violent Crimes?Are Food Additives Good or Bad? Consumer Views VaryDrug Studies in Children Often Go Unfinished: Study
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Many Supplements Still Contain Dangerous Stimulants: Study

HealthDay News
by By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Oct 22nd 2018

new article illustration

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug and Food Administration has repeatedly warned manufacturers that many dietary supplements contain dangerous, experimental stimulants. But according to a new report, 75 percent of supplements tested still contain the compounds.

"Consumers turn to supplements for safe, natural ways to increase energy, improve workouts or lose weight," said study author Dr. Pieter Cohen, an associate professor with Harvard Medical School. "[But] what most consumers don't know is that supplements can be sold as if they give you energy, help you lose weight or just about anything, as long as the supplement does not claim to cure or treat disease."

His team's findings centered on four unapproved stimulants: DMAA, DMBA, BMPEA and oxilofrine.

The four have become replacements for the stimulant ephedra, which the FDA banned from supplements in 2004 following reports that it raised the risk for heart attack, stroke and death.

Between 2013 and 2016, the FDA found that 12 different supplement brands contained one or more of the four unapproved stimulants. But despite public notice warnings from the agency, three-quarters of the supplements still contained at least one prohibited stimulant in 2017. And half contained two or more.

The finding raises fresh concerns about supplement safety, and comes on the heels of another troubling analysis published just last week by the California Department of Public Health's Food and Drug Branch.

That investigation revealed that the FDA had issued more than 700 warnings over the last decade about potentially hazardous ingredients found in supplements promoted as sexual, weight-loss and muscle growth aids.

But because the FDA classifies dietary supplements as a food -- rather than as drugs -- supplement manufacturers do not have to prove a supplement is safe or effective before selling it to the public.

If, however, the FDA ultimately determines that a supplement already on the market is potentially hazardous, it can recall the product or issue a "public notice" concerning problematic ingredients.

In a letter published online Oct. 22 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, Cohen and his colleagues point to an earlier study that suggests that FDA recalls, for one, are largely ineffective.

The latest investigation focused on the effectiveness of public notice warnings, and found equally poor results.

"The FDA seems to imagine that if they simply request that firms remove an experimental stimulant from commerce, the stimulant will be removed," Cohen said. "Clearly this is wishful thinking on the part of the FDA."

Cohen noted that he and his associates conducted two analyses of 12 supplements previously issued public notices for unapproved ingredients.

The first analysis took place in 2014. At that time, all 12 supplements contained at least one of the four prohibited stimulants.

The second analysis took place in 2017. At that point, nine of the 12 brands contained at least one prohibited supplement and six contained two.

The team also pointed out that although DMBA had not been found in any of the 12 supplements in 2014, it was found in a third of the supplements in 2017, two years after the FDA issued a public notice raising concern about the ingredient.

"Until the law is reformed and the FDA aggressively enforces the law, these potentially dangerous ingredients will likely remain in supplements," said Cohen.

Dr. Mitchell Katz is president and CEO of NYC Health and Hospitals in New York City, and author of an accompanying editorial. He suggested that the upshot is that the FDA is hamstrung in what it can do.

"The FDA is not allowed by federal law to investigate a product before it is marketed," Katz noted. "Therefore, all that the FDA can do under current law is respond to complaints and issue guidelines of what can and cannot be in supplements."

The bottom line, said Katz, is that "people should know that the supplements they are taking are not tested [and] may contain substances that are not on the label."

More information

There's more on supplement regulations at U.S. Food and Drug Administration.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net