Medications
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Brain Bleed Risk Puts Safety of Low-Dose Aspirin in DoubtAmericans' Prescription Med Use Is DecliningFDA Puts Tough Warning Label on Ambien, Lunesta, Other Sleep AidsDietary Supplements Do Nothing for You: StudyAre 'Inactive' Ingredients in Your Drugs Really So Harmless?Which Misused Prescription Meds Send Americans to the ER?Health Tip: What You Should Know About AntibioticsWhite House Plan to Disclose Drug Prices May Not Drive Down Costs: StudyWhen Your Medications Are the News1 in 4 Antibiotic Prescriptions Isn't Needed: StudyDermatologists Cut Back on Antibiotics But Still Prescribe the MostEven Older Drugs Are Getting Steep Price Hikes, Study FindsNew Cholesterol Drug's High Price May Not Be Worth It: StudyAre You Overdoing Antibiotics?Health Tip: Safe Tips For Antibiotic UseDrug Studies in Children Often Go Unfinished: StudyAmerica Is Worried About Antibiotic ResistanceMany U.S. Parents Share Leftover Antibiotics: SurveyFirst U.S. Drug Containing Marijuana-Derived Ingredient Goes on SaleGot Unused Prescription Meds? Saturday Is National Drug Take-Back DayAre Generics as Good as Brand-Name Drugs?White House Wants Prices in Drug Ads, But Big Pharma Fights BackHalf of Antibiotics Given Without Infection DiagnosisDoes Big Pharma Hike Prices When Meds Are in Short Supply?Timing May Be Critical When Taking MedsSurprising Tactic in War Against Antibiotic ResistanceOpium Poppy Genome Research May Aid Painkiller ProductionAs U.S. Kids Take More Meds, Dangerous Drug Mixes Could RiseHealth Tip: Grapefruit May Interact With MedicationFDA Slaps Stronger Warnings on Potent Class of AntibioticsTesting for Penicillin Allergy May Cut 'Superbug' Infection RiskAre Your Meds Making You Depressed?Health Tip: Packing Prescriptions for Travel
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

White House Plan to Disclose Drug Prices May Not Drive Down Costs: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jan 25th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- By itself, a Trump administration plan to make drug companies disclose the cost of their medicines in TV ads is unlikely to help tame drug prices, a new study shows.

Researchers did find that revealing the cost of expensive drugs in ads would significantly lower patient demand for those drugs, but that impact largely vanished when the ads included a modifier, such as an explanation that the drug would be low-cost or free with insurance coverage or other discounts.

"Will price disclosure work at all? The answer is yes: price disclosure works, absent anything else," said study co-author Bill Tayler, a professor of accounting at Brigham Young University in Salt Lake City.

"But in a world where pharmaceutical companies behave logically, they will surely use a modifier of sorts that would unwind the entire benefit of this legislation," Tayler added in a university news release.

The study included 580 participants who were told to imagine they had recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and were then shown one of five ads for a fictional diabetes prescription drug.

One version of the ad did not disclose the drug's price, while the other four mentioned either a low ($50 a month) or a high ($15,500 a month) price. Two ads were modified to say that eligible patients may be able to get the drug for free because of insurance coverage or coupon availability.

Participants who saw the ad with the high-price and no modifier were much less likely to say they'd ask their doctor about the drug, ask their insurance provider about the drug, research the drug online, or take the drug.

But those who saw the ads with high prices and modifying language were still interested in the drug, the findings showed.

According to study co-author Ge Bai, an associate professor of accounting at Johns Hopkins University, "Price disclosure in drug ads works only under the 'tell the price, only the price, nothing but the price' scenario."

The proposal to include prices in drug ads is opposed by the pharmaceutical industry.

Tayler concluded that "the suggested policy is unlikely to do harm, but it is also unlikely to help much to control pharmaceutical prices. This is not the most effective route and it could be very costly in terms of the lawsuits that are going to result. Why fight the legal battle if it's not going to work?"

The study was published Jan. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

More information

The American Hospital Association has more on rising drug prices.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net