Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Blood Donations Needed: Red CrossKeep Unused Meds Out of the Hands of AddictsFew U.S. Universities Are Smoke-FreeNeed Emergency Air Lift to Hospital? It Could Cost You $40,000California Took on Anti-Vaxxers, and WonAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnAHA News: Even the Threat of Homelessness May Bring Higher Stroke RiskFDA Warns Two Kratom Marketers About False ClaimsExperts Want Doctors to Add Vaping to Youth Prevention PitchMany Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: StudyGlobal Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed ResultsOne Simple Food Substitution Might Help Save the PlanetAHA News: 3 Simple Steps Could Save 94 Million Lives WorldwideRace Affects Life Expectancy in Major U.S. CitiesDrugstores Often Don't Have Opioid Antidote in Stock, Philly Study ShowsAntibiotics Pollute Rivers Worldwide: StudyAHA News: For LGBTQ Patients, Discrimination Can Become Barrier to Medical CareImmigrants Make Up 1 in 4 U.S. Health Care WorkersFDA Takes Hard Look at CBDPatients Who Read Doctors' Notes More Likely to Take Their MedsU.S. Measles Cases for 2019 Already Exceed All Annual Totals Since 1992: CDCBreathe Easier, New York City: Clean-Air Taxi Rules Are WorkingDoctor Burnout Costly for Patients, Health Care SystemMany 'Dehumanize' People with ObesityBlood Banks Could Help Screen for Hereditary High CholesterolRed Cross Needs Type O Blood to Ease ShortageLess Pain, More Car Crashes: Legalized Marijuana a Mixed BagPolitical Controversies Could Fuel Bullying of LGBT Youth: StudyCBD -- It's Everywhere, But Does It Work?Brief EMS Training Saves Lives After Brain InjuryU.S. Improves Emergency Readiness, but Gaps PersistSlowing Climate Change Could Cut Health Costs, Save MoneyDispensing Opioid Antidote Without a Prescription Might Save LivesNot Just Opioids: Deaths Tied to Cocaine, Meth Are Soaring, TooMost Americans Hit Hard by Medical BillsYour Virtual Doctor Will 'See' You NowHigh Measles Rates Mean Kids, Adults Need Proper Vaccination: CDCMany Drivers Testing Positive for Marijuana, Even With Kids in CarMedicaid Could Save $2.6 Billion a Year With Dip in SmokingFDA Halts All Sales of Pelvic Mesh Products Tied to Injuries in WomenAnother Cost of the Opioid Epidemic: Billions of Dollars in Lost TaxesHealth Tip: Using an AEDNurse Practitioners Often Restricted From Prescribing Opioid TreatmentsForested Counties Have Lower Medicare Costs, Study FindsSimple CPR Doubles Survival OddsUninsured Get Short Shrift on Hospital StaysSpecial Bag Helps Patients Get Rid of Unused OpioidsHealth Tip: Responsibilities of Non-VaccinationDo Doctors Hounded by Malpractice Claims Just Shift Their Practice Elsewhere?Bans on Texting While Behind the Wheel Making Roads Safer
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Global Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed Results

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jun 20th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette use fell in most countries over the past three decades, but increased in some nations, notably China, a new global study says.

Researchers analyzed data from 71 countries that represent 85% of the world's population and account for more than 95% of global cigarette use.

While overall cigarette use declined, there were significant differences between countries.

About 2.5 million metric tons (MMT) of cigarettes were smoked in China in 2013, more than Russia (0.36 MMT), the United States (0.28 MMT), Indonesia (0.28 MMT), Japan (0.20 MMT), and the next 35 highest consuming countries combined.

The United States and Japan had reductions of more than 0.1 MMT over a decade, while Russian consumption plateaued, and Chinese and Indonesian consumption rose by 0.75 MMT and 0.1 MMT, respectively.

The study was published June 19 in The BMJ.

A second study in the same issue of the journal looked at global cigarette use after adoption of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, a 2003 international treaty meant to reduce tobacco use.

It found that wealthy and European countries had a decrease in annual consumption of more than 1,000 cigarettes per adult, but low- and middle-income and Asian countries had an annual increase of more than 500 cigarettes per adult.

The findings "should motivate greater implementation of proven tobacco control policies" and "encourage more assertive responses to tobacco industry activities," the study authors wrote. Both studies were led by Steven Hoffman, from York University in Toronto.

A third study in the same issue of the journal examined data from the United States, Canada and England and found that e-cigarette rose use among teens ages 16-19 in the United States and Canada in 2017 and 2018, and that smoking increased among Canadian teens in that age group.

The study, led by David Hammond, of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, also found that use of Juul brand e-cigarettes rose in the United States, Canada and England.

"Taken together, these new studies emphasize the value of comparative research for tobacco control across different countries," Linda Bauld wrote in an accompanying editorial.

"They also warn against complacency in our attempts to address smoking, now and in the future," said Bauld, of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Continued investment in international tobacco control is more important than ever, particularly in low- and middle-income countries with limited resources to fight tobacco industry attempts to undermine anti-tobacco policies, she concluded.

More information

The American Lung Association outlines the health dangers of smoking.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net