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Experts Want Doctors to Add Vaping to Youth Prevention Pitch

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jun 25th 2019

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TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors should add electronic cigarettes to their efforts to prevent young people from using tobacco, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says.

It's the most significant change in a draft statement updating 2013 recommendations on steps primary care providers should take to stop tobacco use in kids.

Those measures include education and brief counseling.

The task force -- an independent, volunteer panel of experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine -- also called for more research on ways to help young people quit using tobacco.

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, and it usually starts before adulthood. Nearly 90% of smokers try their first cigarette before age 18, according to the task force.

"Preventing tobacco use among our young people is critical to the health of the nation," task force member Dr. Michael Silverstein said in an organization news release. "All youth are at risk for tobacco use and should be provided with interventions to help prevent them from ever starting."

Vaping is now more common among young people than traditional cigarette smoking. More than 1 million U.S. high school students used cigarettes in 2018, but more than 3 million (1 in 5 high schoolers) used e-cigarettes.

The task force also examined evidence on ways to help young people quit using tobacco and found a serious shortfall in that area.

"Helping youth quit using tobacco is vital to their health," said task force member Dr. Chien-Wen Tseng. "Unfortunately, studies have not yet identified effective ways to help children and teens quit, and the task force is calling for more research in this area."

The task force's draft recommendation and evidence review have been posted on its website for public review. Comments can be submitted through July 22.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on risks of vaping for kids and young adults.




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To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


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