Smoking
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Think Vaping Is Heathier for Your Heart Than Smoking? Think AgainTrump Administration Wants to Raise Age to Buy E-Cigs to 21Vitamin E Acetate Is Leading Suspect in Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses: CDCVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,000, CDC SaysJuul Stops Sales of Mint-Flavored E-Cigarettes1 in 4 High School Kids Vape, Mint Flavor PreferredStill Way Too Much Smoking in Movies Aimed at KidsClose to 1,900 Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness, CDC SaysHealth Tip: Signs of Nicotine WithdrawalIt May Be Even Tougher for Women to Quit Smoking Than MenFlavored E-Cigarettes Get Teens Hooked on Vaping, Study FindsCases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Now Top 1,600Nasal Swab Could Help Gauge Smokers' Odds for Lung CancerFlavors Draw Young People to Lifetime Habit of Vaping, Study ShowsJuul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Flavors of E-CigarettesLight Smoking Causes More Lung Damage Than Once Suspected: StudyClose to 1,300 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Now IdentifiedMouse Study Suggests Vaping Might Raise Cancer RiskCases of Serious Vaping-Linked Lung Injury Now Top 1,000Teen Use of Flavored E-Cigarettes Keeps Rising'Toxic Fumes' May Be Driving Vaping-Linked Lung IllnessesPoll Finds Many Young Americans Think Vaping is SafeTHC-Laced Products May Be to Blame for Majority of Vaping-Linked Illnesses: CDCMore Than 800 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Across 46 States, CDC SaysE-Cigarette Maker Juul Stops All Advertising, Replaces CEODoes Parents' Smoking Raise Future Heart Risks for Kids?'He May Need a Ventilator': One Teen's Fight Against Vaping-Linked Lung IllnessFlavored E-Cigarettes May Make Asthma WorseFlavored E-Cigarette Use Soars Among Young AdultsCases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Rise to 530 Across 38 States: CDCChemicals From Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Devices Not Harmless: StudyScientists Find Unsafe Levels of Known Carcinogen in Menthol E-CigarettesCDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380 in 36 StatesTrump Pushing for Nationwide Ban on Flavored E-CigarettesAre Hookahs Safer Than Cigarettes? Chemical Study Says No WayWould a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?FDA Warns Juul About Illegal Marketing Claims and Pitch to YouthVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Double, Vitamin E Acetate Leading SuspectHealth Officials Close in on Culprit in Vaping Lung Injury CasesAs Lung Injury Cases Rise, CDC Says 'Don't Vape'Jumps in Pot Use, Depression and Drinking Threaten Gains Against SmokingLots of Teens Are Breathing in Others' Vaping FumesVaping May Trigger Lung Damage Like That Seen in EmphysemaIn-Store Marketing Helps Get Kids VapingFirst Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in IllinoisCases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep RisingVaping Constricts Blood Vessels, Raising Heart, Lung ConcernsWhen Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?AHA News: Amid 'Epidemic' of School Vaping, a Search for SolutionsFDA Proposes Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarettes
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development

Would a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 10th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Health warnings on individual cigarettes could be a more powerful way to coax smokers to quit than warnings on packages, British researchers say.

They assessed the reactions of 120 smokers, 16 and older, to the warning "Smoking kills" printed on individual cigarettes.

Smokers said the warnings could potentially work.

They said a caution on each cigarette would extend the health message, because it would be visible when each smoke is taken from a pack, lit, left in an ashtray, and with every puff.

Many of the female participants considered a warning on individual cigarettes depressing, worrying and frightening, according to the Cancer Research U.K.-funded study. It was recently published in the journal Addiction Research and Theory.

A warning visible to others could be a deterrent, the study found.

"The consensus was that individual cigarettes emblazoned with warnings would be off-putting for young people, those starting to smoke, and non-smokers," said study leader Crawford Moodie. He's a senior research fellow at the University of Stirling's Institute for Social Marketing in Scotland.

"This study suggests that the introduction of such warnings could impact the decision-making of these groups. It shows that this approach is a viable policy option and one which would -- for the first time -- extend health messaging to the consumption experience," Moodie said in a university news release.

Government officials in Scotland and Canada are considering requiring warnings on individual cigarettes.

Linda Bauld, a Cancer Research UK prevention expert, said too many young people are starting to smoke.

"Government anti-smoking campaigns and tax rises on cigarettes remain the most effective methods to stop young people starting smoking, but we need to continue to explore innovative ways to deter them from using cigarettes to ensure that youth smoking rates continue to drop," she said in the release.

"This study shows that tactics like making the cigarettes themselves unappealing could be an effective way of doing this," Bauld added.

More information

The American Lung Association has more on the dangers of smoking.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

To quit smoking, call Connecticut QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  Please contact HBH Intake Department at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net