Pain Management
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
More Patients Turning to Medical Marijuana for Arthritis PainCould an Injected Electrode Control Your Pain Without Drugs?If Prescribed Opioids for Pain, Ask Lots of Questions: FDAMore Opioids Doesn't Mean Less Chronic Pain: StudyLegal Pot Products Too Potent for Chronic PainOpioids Won't Help Arthritis Patients Long-Term: StudyFewer Opioids After Eye Surgery Don't Mean More Post-Op PainTougher Rules on Opioids After Surgery Doesn't Mean More Pain for PatientsHealth Tip: Taking Anti-Inflammatory Drugs1 in 5 Heart Pacemaker Patients Prescribed Opioids After SurgeryUsing Opioids After Vasectomy May Trigger Persistent Use: StudyWhat Are the Risks of Pain Relief Alternatives to Opioids?'Alarming' Number of Lupus Patients Use Opioids for Pain: StudyOpioid Prescriptions for Eye Surgery Patients SurgeDocs Prescribe More Opioids at Certain Time of DayU.S. Opioid Prescription Rate Is 7 Times That of SwedenMany Americans Eying CBD, Pot as Pain Relievers Without Knowing RisksCBD Is the Rage, But More Science Needed on Safety, EffectivenessMixing Marijuana With Opioids May Not Be Good for Mental HealthMany Doctors Refusing Care of People Prescribed OpioidsFewer Opioid Painkillers Can Still Control Surgery PainFDA Grants First Approvals for Generic Versions of LyricaMore Than 5 Million U.S. Cancer Survivors Deal With Chronic PainThe Safer Way to Ease Post-Surgical PainOpioids Prescribed in Hospital Often Tied to Long-Term UseDentists Prescribe Antibiotics Far Too Often: StudyMany Patients Don't Need Opioids After Surgery
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Medications

Health Tip: Taking Anti-Inflammatory Drugs


HealthDay News
Updated: Oct 23rd 2019

(HealthDay News) -- Pain relievers like ibuprofen, naproxen and celecoxib are popular anti-inflammatory drugs for back pain, headache and other aches and pains.

Though these drugs have a good safety history, the risk of serious side effects rises when the medications are taken for long periods or in high doses, says Harvard Medical School.

To ensure you're taking the appropriate amounts, the school recommends:

  • Keep an updated list of all medications you take.
  • Read labels and instructions. Take medications only as prescribed.
  • When in doubt, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

If you don't think your pain reliever is helping, talk to your doctor about changing medications.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net