Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
AHA News: Health Emergency? Don't Hesitate to Get HelpAn Expert's Guide to Fact-Checking Coronavirus Info OnlineRacial, Ethnic Gaps in Insurance Put Moms, Babies at Risk: StudyCelebrity Suicides Spawn 'Copycat' Tragedies, Study ShowsVaccine Myths Widespread on the Web, Especially Facebook: Study
The Doctor Gap: In Areas of Greatest Need, Primary Care Is a Team Effort">
The Doctor Gap: In Areas of Greatest Need, Primary Care Is a Team Effort
The Doctor Gap: Where Are All the Mental Health Care Providers?New, Graphic Health Warnings Coming for U.S. Cigarette PacksWith New Boost From Medicare, 'Telemedicine' Steps Up to Fight CoronavirusThe Doctor Gap: In Rural America, It's All Hands on DeckThe Doctor Gap: A Training Program for Country-Doc WannabesDon't Believe All the 'Science' on CBD ProductsMany Car Crash Deaths Involve Alcohol Levels Below Legal Limit: StudyThe Doctor Gap: Does America Have a Physician Shortage?12 Weeks of Paid Maternity Leave Benefits Everyone: StudyVaping Videos Soaring on YouTubeU.S. Blood Donors Needed in Face of COVID-19 CrisisIt's Tough for Clinical Trial Participants to Learn ResultsBogus Coronavirus 'Meds' Targeted by FDAOnly 1 in 5 Have Fast Access to State-of-the-Art Stroke CareOne Key Way to Curb Coronavirus Spread: More Paid Sick LeaveU.S. Drug Prices Have Risen Three Times Faster Than InflationU.S. Announces More Travel Restrictions as First Coronavirus Death ReportedIt's Not Medical Outcomes That Drive Patients' Hospital ReviewsChicago's Short-Lived 'Soda Tax' Cut Consumption, Boosted Health Care FundsSocial Media Stokes Myths About VaccinesBrand-Name Rx Rise After Docs Get Drug Company Perks: StudyAs Prices Rise for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Meds, Patients Go WithoutRoll Up Your Sleeve and Donate Blood for Cancer PatientsShotguns Often Play Tragic Role in Rural Teens' Suicides: StudyPrice Hikes Have Patients Turning to Craigslist for Insulin, Asthma InhalersConsumers Waste Twice as Much Food as Experts ThoughtStricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: StudyCaregivers Give Short Shrift to Their Own HealthMedicare Could Save Billions If Allowed to Negotiate Insulin PricesDentists Among Top Prescribers of OpioidsBedside 'Sitters' May Not Prevent Hospital FallsDoes Race Play a Part in ICU Outcomes?When Pharmacists Allowed to Give Anti-Opioid Med Without Rx, Access SoarsNew Study Supports Lowering Age of First ColonoscopyAgeism Affects People Around the GlobeLife Expectancy in U.S. Increases for First Time in 4 YearsJust 1% of Doctors Prescribe Nearly Half of Opioids in U.S.AHA News: These Doctors Want to Write 'Farmacy' PrescriptionsCan Online Reviews Help Health Inspectors Keep Tabs on Restaurants?AHA News: Can Social Media Be Good for Your Health?Flame Retardants, Pesticides Remain Threat to U.S. Health: StudySimple Tweak to Hospital Computer Program Cuts Opioid PrescriptionsJust 2% of Patients Who Need It Get Anti-Opioid Drug NaloxoneAre Doctors Discarding 'Injured' Kidneys That Might Be Used for Transplant?
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Prepared Bystanders Save Lives When Cardiac Arrest Strikes

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Dec 24th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Dec. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Few Americans survive cardiac arrest when it happens outside a hospital, but if more people knew how to recognize it and do CPR the odds might be better, a new study finds.

Only about 8% of those who suffer a cardiac arrest -- a sudden stoppage of the heart -- survive. Simply knowing what to do and doing it can increase the chance of survival, researchers say.

Three steps can save lives:

  • Recognizing the signs of cardiac arrest -- loss of consciousness, no pulse or breathing -- and calling 911.
  • Beginning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) using chest compressions. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends using the steady beat of the classic disco song "Stayin' Alive" as a guide.
  • Using an automated external defibrillator (AED) to deliver an electric shock to restart a victim's heart.

Bystanders should start CPR whenever someone is unresponsive and not breathing normally, the AHA advises.

"For every minute that a person with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest goes without CPR and defibrillation, the chance of survival decreases by 7 to 10%," Dr. William Brady, an emergency doctor at University of Virginia, wrote recently in the New England Journal of Medicine.

A 2010 review of more than 10,000 cardiac arrests found that 22% of patients who received bystander CPR survived, compared with 8% of those who didn't.

And a 2018 study of more than 50,000 cardiac arrests found that 67% of patients treated with an AED by a bystander survived, compared with 43% of those whose hearts were shocked after rescue crews arrived.

To improve survival odds, more people need to be trained, especially in CPR, the researchers said. Brady estimated that only about 2% of Americans a year get CPR training.

Efforts that might get more people to start CPR early include making training sessions shorter and using smartphone apps to alert trained people to a cardiac arrest near them, he suggested.

"The next major advance in cardiac arrest management is not a new hospital-based treatment nor fire-rescue intervention. It is this pre-arrival care performed by a bystander before fire-rescue personnel arrive and long before a patient is transported to the hospital. This care can allow victims of cardiac arrest to return to their lives and families," Brady said in a university news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on bystander CPR.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net