Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Global Coronavirus Outbreaks Raise Fears of PandemicGlobal Coronavirus Outbreaks Worry Experts, as U.S. Cases Reach 34Sticking With Meds Lowers Lupus Patients' Diabetes RiskU.S. Coronavirus Cases Reach 34: CDCAHA News: Research Opens New Avenues to Reduce Foot, Toe AmputationsYour Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood PressureLung Diseases on the Rise WorldwideNew China Coronavirus Cases Decline, 2 Passengers From Affected Cruise Ship DieAHA News: What Women Need to Know About Breast Cancer and Heart DiseaseU.S. Scientists Take Key Step Towards Towards Coronavirus VaccineQuarantine Ends on Cruise Ship in Japan as Coronavirus Cases Near 75,000AHA News: Race and Gender May Tip the Scales on Traditional Stroke Risk FactorsMeasles Complications Can Affect Every Organ: StudyBabies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma RiskCoronavirus: Are U.S. Hospitals Prepared?14 Americans From Cruise Ship Hit By Coronavirus Test Positive for InfectionHot Chocolate Could Help Ease Painful Clogged Leg VesselsAntiviral Drug, Plasma Transfusions Show Promise in Treating CoronavirusHow to Dispel Your Child's Fears About the New CoronavirusCholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate CancersCoronavirus Spreads Most Easily When Patients Are Sickest: CDCWill Brushing and Flossing Protect You Against Stroke?Young Black Adults More Prone to Stroke, but Don't Know ItAHA News: Stroke Rates Down for Mexican Americans, Up for White AdultsCoronavirus Cases, Deaths Rise Sharply, While 2 New Cases Reported in U.S.Scientists Spot Antibody That Might Help Diagnose, Treat Autoimmune DisordersCoronavirus in America: Keep Your Panic in CheckCoronavirus Spread Slows, But Death Toll Jumps to 1,113Growing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeShingles Vaccine Bonus: Reduced Risk of Stroke?Air Pollution Made in One State Can Cause Deaths in OthersWere You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It MattersStricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: StudyCoronavirus Fears Have U.S. Pharmacies Running Out of Face MasksCoronavirus Death Toll Tops 1,000, While 13th U.S. Case ConfirmedMeds May Not Prevent Migraines in KidsHigh Testosterone Levels Have Different Health Impact for Men and WomenCoronavirus Cases Top 40,000, While Deaths Hit 908With Macular Degeneration, 1 Missed Visit to Eye Doc Can Mean Vision LossHundreds Suspected, 12 Confirmed: How CDC Identified U.S. Coronavirus CasesStudy Finds 'No Clear Rationale' for 45% of Antibiotic PrescriptionsThere's a Virus Spreading in U.S. That's Killed 10,000: The FluSome U.S. Workers Are Bringing Toxins Home to Their KidsAHA News: Expert Heart Advice for Rare Genetic Muscle Disorder9/11 Study Shows PTSD Tied to Earlier DeathWorkers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick DaysMore Americans to Be Evacuated From China; 12th Coronavirus Case ReportedYoung-Onset Parkinson's May Start in the Womb, New Research SuggestsWide Variations Found in 'Normal' Resting Heart RateLab Discovery Offers Promise for Treating Multiple Sclerosis
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Meat Still Isn't Healthy, Study Confirms

HealthDay News
by By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Feb 3rd 2020

new article illustration

MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- After a weekend of football-shaped pigs-in-a-blanket, you probably don't want to hear that the latest study on red and processed meat found that these foods boost your risk of heart and blood vessel disease.

The study also found that meat ups your risk of premature death.

"Consume red and processed meats in moderation because even two servings or more a week are associated with an increased risk of heart disease and mortality," said study senior author Norrina Allen, director of the Institute for Public Health and Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago.

These latest findings might seem to contradict an earlier study -- published in the fall in the Annals of Internal Medicine -- that had meat fans cheering. That study reported researchers couldn't say with certainty that eating red meat or processed meat caused cancer, type 2 diabetes or heart disease.

That study was heralded by many as a green light to eat those foods with abandon. But plenty of studies that came before found links between red and processed meat and health harms. And major health organizations, such as the American Heart Association and American Cancer Society, were quick to recommend against stuffing sausages and other meats back into your diet.

In 2015, a World Health Organization evidence review concluded that processed meats are a proven cancer-causing substance and that red meat probably is, too.

The new research included six prospective studies of nearly 30,000 adults. A prospective trial is one that follows people over time and periodically collects data on their health. In this case, participants were followed for up to 30 years.

The researchers found that those who ate just two servings of processed meats a week had a 7% higher risk of heart disease and stroke. Processed meats include deli meats, hot dogs, bratwurst, sausage and bacon.

Folks who ate two or more servings of unprocessed red meat -- such as beef or pork -- had a 3% higher risk of heart disease and stroke.

Poultry also showed a link, but Allen said the finding was inconsistent and would need to be replicated in another study. There was no association with fish and a higher risk of heart disease and stroke.

Eating two or more servings a week of red meat or processed meat was associated with a 3% increased risk of dying during the study. Fish and poultry were not tied to a higher risk of dying.

The more red and processed meats people ate, the greater their risk of heart disease, stroke and premature death, Allen said.

But just how do these foods increase these risks?

Allen pointed to high amounts of saturated fat and sodium as likely culprits. Plus, she said, if you're eating a lot of meat, you're probably not getting enough fruits and vegetables.

Allen said she would "recommend eating red and processed meat in moderation. Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains -- they have beneficial effects."

Dr. Jeffrey Mechanick is director of the Marie-Josee and Henry Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health at Mount Sinai Heart in New York City. He wasn't part of the study, but reviewed the findings.

"This is a respected and reputable group, and this study is coming on the heels of the previous controversial paper," Mechanick said. "These results support what we've commonly believed."

But he said it's important not to fixate on just one aspect of the diet.

"There's no single food that dictates whether a lifestyle is healthy," Mechanick explained. "If you have an overall healthy eating pattern, having bacon with your eggs isn't going to mitigate your health."

Like Allen, he said the focus should be on eating more vegetables and fruits. Mechanick suggested five to 10 servings a day. He added that diet isn't the only important factor in your health: It's also important to get plenty of physical activity and work on reducing your stress levels.

The study was published Feb. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

More information

For more about red meat and health, see the Harvard Medical School.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net