Parenting
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Tips for Parents of Kids With DiabetesToddler Tantrums? Pediatricians Offer Tips to Curb Bad BehaviorMany Parents Support 'Teens Helping Teens' Mental Health Programs at Schools: PollHow Divorce Harms Kids, and How to Lessen That HarmNew Year, New Tips for Keeping Your Kids Safe and HealthyParents Feel the Strain as Pandemic Adds New Role: TeacherInvolved Dads Make a Difference for Disadvantaged TeensPoll Charts U.S. Parents' Biggest Worries During PandemicParents, Don't Worry if Baby's Sleep Is ErraticHow to Keep Kids Resilient in a Strange Holiday SeasonAHA News: The Heart Health Risks of Being a Single ParentPoll: 1 in 3 Parents Pick Holiday Gathering Over COVID SafetyDoes Parents' Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?Too Many Kids Still Get Antipsychotics They Don't NeedIs the Pandemic Harming Kids' Mental Health?Kids With Food Allergies Can Become Targets for BulliesAlmost 1 in 5 Parents Are 'Vaccine Hesitant,' Study FindsAre Healthy Kids Getting Too Many Heart Tests?Lockdowns Can Widen Kids' Waistlines – Here's How to Curb ThatSocial Media 'Kid Influencers' Are Promoting Junk FoodsIt's Tough to Change the Minds of 'Vaccine-Hesitant' Parents, Study FindsYour Guide to a Safe and Happy HalloweenPlan Ahead to Keep Halloween Safe for Kids With Asthma, AllergiesParents Often in the Dark When Kids Take Up VapingFDA Warns of Danger From 'Benadryl Challenge,' Asks TikTok to Remove VideosHolidays Can Be a Fright for Kids With Food AllergiesHow to Help Ensure Your Students Get Enough SleepMore Than 1 in 3 U.S. Pediatricians Dismiss Vaccine-Refusing FamiliesAre At-Home 'Learning Pods' the Right Fit for Your Family?TikTok 'Benadryl Challenge' Has Killed at Least One TeenAHA News: Healthy Food for At-Home Students Starts With ThisAHA News: How to Keep Kids Active While Learning From Home – and Why That's VitalCyberbullying Could Rise During Lockdown, But Parents Can Stop ItAHA News: As the Coronavirus Upends Schools, Experts Say Don't Forget the ArtsHow to Keep Your Kids Trim Through QuarantineHelp Your Child Cope With Back-to-School JittersAs Pandemic School Year Starts, Survey Shows Most Parents Are OverwhelmedHelp Your Kids Navigate School Amid a Pandemic2 in 3 Parents Nervous About Childhood Vaccines During Pandemic: SurveySpanking on the Decline in American HomesParents: Sharpen up on Your Sunscreen KnowledgeStalking, Harassment of Partners Common Among TeensWhen Teens Feel Loved, Conflicts With Parents Are Easier to Manage: StudyHow the Pandemic Is Changing Summer CampKeep Your Kids Safe in the Water. Here's How2 in 3 Parents Would Send Kids to School in Fall: SurveyShould You Send Your Kid to Summer Camp? Expert Offers AdvicePractice Gun Safety for Your Kids' Sake, Especially During PandemicDon't Let COVID-19 Scuttle Your Child's Health ExamsMom's Depression Can Lead to Behavior Problems in Kids
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Family & Relationship Issues
Internet Addiction and Media Issues

8 Ways to Make Every Day a Valentine For Your Kids

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 11th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As Valentine's Day approaches, parents are reminded to shower their children with love and attention throughout the year.

"Building strong bonds and a positive relationship with your child has a nurturing effect on their physical, emotional, and social development," said Dr. Jennifer Shu, medical editor of the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) parenting website, HealthyChildren.org.

"As parents, the unconditional love and support we show them is one of the most powerful ways we can help them thrive," Shu said in an AAP news release.

The AAP offers these tips to help kids feel loved every day:

  • When talking with children, use positive and encouraging words and set an example of consideration and gratitude by saying "please" and "thank you."
  • Ask your kids about their day and listen to their response. If they tell you about a problem, let them finish before you offer solutions. If you detect signs of anxiety or depression, talk to your pediatrician.
  • To ensure you spend plenty of time together, schedule game nights or other family activities, and have regular one-on-one time with each child to do something they enjoy.
  • Give kids a quick hug or other sign of affection if they're angry or in a bad mood, and wait until they're in a better mood before talking with them about what was bothering them.
  • Respond promptly and lovingly to your child's physical and emotional needs, and make the time to listen when he or she wants to talk.
  • Explain clear and consistent rules and consequences that your children can understand, then follow through right away when they break the rules.
  • Remember: Harsh physical and verbal punishment is ineffective and can damage long-term physical and mental health.
  • Help your children develop positive relationships with friends, siblings and others. Consider inviting friends or neighbors to spend time drinking tea, sharing a meal, playing a game or helping others in need. Encourage your child to be involved in sports or other activities that require teamwork.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on positive parenting.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net