Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Smog Tied to Raised Risk for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's DiseasePoor Brain Blood Flow Might Spur 'Tangles' of Alzheimer'sIs Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?A-Fib Treatment Reduces Patients' Dementia RiskFall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early StagesPTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia RiskNew Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's RiskIs Rural Appalachia a Hotspot for Alzheimer's?Why Are Dementia Patients Getting Risky Psychiatric Drugs?Get Dizzy When Standing Up? It Could Be Risk Factor for DementiaCan Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer'sUnder 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: StudyCould the Flu Shot Lower Your Risk for Alzheimer's?Will Your Brain Stay Sharp Into Your 90s? Certain Factors Are KeyMany Americans With Dementia Live in Homes With GunsBrain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer'sHormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in WomenMiddle-Age Obesity Linked to Higher Odds for DementiaCould Crohn's, Colitis Raise Dementia Risk?5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sCOVID-19 Brings New Challenges to Alzheimer's CaregivingAlzheimer's Gene Linked to Severe COVID-19 RiskHealthier Heart, Better Brain in Old AgeAHA News: Hearing Loss and the Connection to Alzheimer's Disease, DementiaBrain Plaques Signal Alzheimer's Even Before Other Symptoms Emerge: StudyCertain Gene Might Help Shield At-Risk People From Alzheimer'sHow to Connect With Nursing Home Patients in QuarantineHow to Ease Loved Ones With Alzheimer's Through the PandemicCaring for Dementia Patient During Pandemic? Try These Stress-Busting TipsRecovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes Longer Than Expected: StudyDaily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study FindsStudy Ties Brain Inflammation to Several Types of DementiaHeart Drug Combos Might Also Lower Your Dementia Risk: StudyU.S. Primary Care Docs Unprepared for Surge in Alzheimer's CasesMaria Shriver Sounds the Alarm on Women and Alzheimer'sTraumatic Brain Injuries Raise Risk of Psychiatric Ills in SoldiersGrowing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeTwo Experimental Drugs Disappoint With Inherited Alzheimer'sGene Variant Ups Dementia Risk in Parkinson's Patients: StudyGene Variation May Protect Against Alzheimer's: StudyWhen Dementia Harms Speech, Native Language MattersEven 1 Night's Bad Sleep Can Raise Levels of a Brain 'Marker' for Alzheimer'sAHA News: Worried About Dementia? Check This Blood Pressure NumberStudy Might Point Alzheimer's Research in Whole New DirectionMore Doubt That Plaques in the Brain Cause Alzheimer'sObesity in Middle Age Could Raise Odds for Alzheimer's LaterCan Air Pollution Take a Toll on Your Memory?Animal Study Offers Hope for Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Aging & Geriatrics
Memory Problems
Elder Care

PTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia Risk

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 17th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)may significantly increase the risk of dementia later in life, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people with a history of PTSD were up to two times more likely to develop dementia than those who never had PTSD.

"Our study provides important new evidence of how traumatic experiences can impact brain health, and how the long-term effects of trauma may impact the brain in many ways increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and dementia," said senior study author Dr. Vasiliki Orgeta. She's an associate professor of psychiatry at University College London, in the United Kingdom.

"PTSD, which appears to be common among people who have been hospitalized with COVID-19, remains an underdiagnosed, undertreated, and under researched mental health condition, yet it can have serious long-term consequences," Orgeta said in a university news release.

For the study, researchers analyzed 13 studies from four continents that included a total of nearly 1.7 million people. Data from eight of the studies showed that people with PTSD had a 61% higher risk of dementia up to 17 years later.

When the investigators examined data from two studies that used different methods, they found that PTSD was associated with a twofold higher risk of dementia.

The study also found that dementia risk among people who'd had PTSD was more than two times higher in the general population than among veterans.

This may be because veterans are typically more likely to receive treatment for PTSD than people in the general population (in the countries included in the analysis), so the findings suggest that treating PTSD may reduce dementia risk, the study authors noted.

"A lot of people with PTSD don't access treatment, sometimes due to a lack of mental health care capacity but also because of stigma, which often keeps people away from seeking help. We now have more evidence of how traumatic experiences and accessing treatment could have a long-lasting impact for individuals and influence future risk of developing dementia," Orgeta said.

The risk of dementia among people with PTSD may be even higher than these findings suggest because PTSD also increases the likelihood of other dementia risk factors, such as depression, social isolation and heavy drinking, according to the researchers.

It's not clear how PTSD increases dementia risk, but perhaps hypervigilance and recurrent re-experiencing of trauma contribute to stress-related activity in the brain, the team added.

The study was published Sept. 16 in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more about PTSD.




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net