Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
AHA News: How to Make Sure Everyone Gets a Fair Shot at the COVID-19 Vaccine'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health'Breakthrough' COVID Infections After Vaccination Very Rare: StudyYou Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts WarnLong-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of IllnessWildfire Smoke Can Trigger Eczema, Study FindsHow 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your RaceTwo Is Not Better Than One When It Comes to Blood ThinnersDo You Live in One of America's Unhealthiest Cities for Polluted Air?How Gum Disease Could Raise Your Odds for Severe COVID-19Have Allergies? See If You're at Risk for Severe COVID Vaccine ReactionWorkers' Deaths From Paint Stripping Chemicals Are on the RiseCould Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?Supply May Soon Outstrip Demand in U.S. Vaccine Rollout: ReportMeatpacking Plants Accounted for 334,000 U.S. COVID Cases: StudyDirty Air Could Raise COVID Risks for People With Asthma, COPD'Double-Masking' It? Proper Fit Is Crucial, Study FindsEvery American Adult Now Eligible for COVID-19 VaccineLive Near a 'Superfund' Site? Your Life Span Might Be ShorterHormone Treatments May Raise Blood Pressure in Transgender PeopleUnexplained Drop in Resting Heart Rate in Youth 'Not a Good Thing'Common MS Meds Might Be Less Effective in Black PatientsIs It Allergies or COVID? Expert Shows How to Tell the DifferenceMany Employees Have Mixed Feelings as Offices ReopenHalf of American Adults Have Now Gotten at Least One COVID Vaccine ShotWarmer Climate, More Pollen, Worse Allergies: How to Fight BackCycling During Dialysis? It Might Help PatientsPregnancy Raises the Risk for Kidney StonesU.S. Marines Study Finds Getting COVID Won't Protect Young People From ReinfectionKnow the Signs of Rare Blood Clot Linked With J & J Vaccine1 in 50 COVID Patients in ICU Will Develop a StrokeBooster Shots a Likely Reality for COVID-Vaccinated AmericansAHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's HealthMost Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: PollRashes Can Occur After COVID Vaccine,  But Dermatologists Say 'Don't Worry'Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus EuropeCOVID Plus 'Bleeding' Stroke Doubles a Patient's Death RiskLower Rates of COVID in States That Mandated Masks: StudyCDC Panel Says It Needs More Time to Study J&J Vaccine Clotting CasesOne Good Way to Help Beat COVID: ExerciseDiabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers HopeResearch Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer'sNo Rise in Global Suicide Rate in First Months of PandemicCloth Masks Do Make Workouts a Bit Tougher, Study FindsMany Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic SymptomsBiden, Fauci Say Pause in J&J COVID Vaccine Is Sign That Safety Comes FirstAHA News: Straight Answers to Common Questions About COVID-19 VaccinesJ&J Vaccine 'Pause' Is Not Mandate Against the Shot, FDA SaysU.K. Variant Won't Trigger More Severe COVID, Studies FindNewborns Won't Get COVID Through Infected Mom's Breast Milk: Study
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Study Ties Gum Disease to High Blood Pressure

HealthDay News
by Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 29th 2021

new article illustration

MONDAY, March 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Want to ward off high blood pressure? Don't forget to brush and floss.

A new study finds that severe gum disease may make an otherwise healthy person significantly more likely to develop high blood pressure.

"[Our] evidence indicates that periodontal bacteria cause damage to the gums and also triggers inflammatory responses that can impact the development of systemic diseases including" high blood pressure, said study author Dr. Francesco D'Aiuto, head of the periodontology unit at University College London Eastman Dental Institute. He spoke in a news release from the journal Hypertension, which published the report March 29.

The researchers studied 250 otherwise healthy adults with severe periodontitis and 250 healthy adults without the gum disease. Their median age was 35, meaning half were older, half younger.

Participants with gum disease were twice as likely to have high systolic blood pressure (140 mm Hg or more), than those with healthy gums (14% and 7%, respectively), according to the findings. The systolic level -- top number in a blood pressure reading -- is how much pressure your blood is exerting on your blood vessels as it moves through the body.

While only an association and not a cause-and-effect link was established, the findings suggest that about 50% of adults could have undetected high blood pressure due to gum disease -- a tissue infection that can also lead to inflammation and bone or tooth loss.

Researchers said preventing and treating gum disease may be a cost-effective way to reduce systemic inflammation and improve function of the endothelium, the thin lining inside the heart and blood vessels.

"Patients with gum disease often present with elevated blood pressure, especially when there is active gingival inflammation, or bleeding of the gums," said lead author Dr. Eva Muñoz Aguilera, senior researcher at the institute.

Because high blood pressure often has no outward symptoms, many individuals may be unaware that they are at increased risk for heart-related problems, she added in the release.

Having dental professionals screen for high blood pressure and make referrals to primary care providers while medical professionals also screen and refer for gum disease could benefit patients' health and reduce the burden of high blood pressure and its complications, according to D'Aiuto.

"Oral health strategies such as brushing teeth twice daily are proven to be very effective in managing and preventing the most common oral conditions, and our study's results indicate they can also be a powerful and affordable tool to help prevent hypertension," D'Aiuto concluded.

More information

The American Academy of Periodontology has more on gum disease.

SOURCE: Hypertension, news release, March 29, 2021




Facebook

Amazon Smile

 

Children and Adult services are available now with no wait time.  

Please contact HBH at 860-548-0101, option 2.

 


powered by centersite dot net